Presentation formats

Contributions to EARLI SIG 14 will be possible through four different presentation formats :

1. Keynote addresses are invited by the organising committee and delivered by experienced scholars investigating various aspects of the conference topic.  Keynote addresses are scheduled for 60 minutes and include 15 minutes for an open discussion with the audience.

2. Individual paper sessions normally include four oral presentations of empirical papers and are scheduled for 120 minutes. Each individual presentation lasts 20 minutes and is followed by a discussion with the audience of 10 minutes. Presentations of empirical papers have to include data and results in order to be accepted for the conference. If your research is at an earlier stage, suitable conference formats are poster or round table sessions as well as no or not perfect data sessions. Besides empirical papers, theoretical papers are also welcome. In each room, in which paper sessions will take place, a computer, digital projector, and internet access will be provided.

3. Interactive poster sessions normally include six posters which are used to present research studies with a strong visual component. Poster sessions are scheduled for 90 minutes. At the beginning, a chair gathers the presenters and the audience, and a short oral presentation of about 5 minutes for each poster is given. For clarification, each individual presentation is followed by a brief discussion between the presenter and the audience. After all posters have been briefly presented and discussed, sufficient room is reserved for an interactive in-depth discussion between the presenter and a smaller audience that is specifically interested in particular posters. Poster presentations are an ideal opportunity to present research that is at an earlier stage as they allow a more direct interaction between the researcher and the audience. In each room, in which poster sessions will take place, poster boards and materials for attaching the posters to the boards will be provided.

4. Thematic symposia aim at examining a single topic in depth from multiple perspectives. Symposia normally include three to four coherent oral presentations of research papers on one topic and are scheduled for 120 minutes. Each individual presentation lasts 15 minutes and is followed by a brief discussion with the audience of 2 to 3 minutes. Subsequently, a discussant, who is familiar with all individual papers, summarizes and interactively discusses the four contributions. Presentations of empirical papers have to include data and results in order to be accepted for the conference. Organizers of symposia have to nominate a chairperson who is responsible for directing the session (organizers may also be the chairpersons). Furthermore, organizers have to nominate the discussant who is responsible for integrating the individual contributions. In each room, in which symposia will take place, a computer, digital projector, and internet access will be provided. 

5. Round table sessions normally include four presentations and provide an opportunity to discuss challenging research issues or to explore new research approaches. This may involve the discussion of work in progress. Round table sessions are scheduled for 120 minutes. First, every presenter briefly introduces the research project or issue at hand and outlines current challenges (e.g., emerging data or a research problem) in no more than 10 minutes. Second, as the main element of every round table contribution, the presenter invites the audience to enter an in-depth discussion of the outlined issues, which may last up to 15 minutes. In each room, in which round table sessions will take place, a computer, digital projector, and internet access will be provided.

6. No or not perfect data sessions normally include four oral presentations of draft papers or proposals and provide an opportunity to present empirical work which is at an early stage (e.g., research ideas or work in progress). This implies that either no data have been collected yet or that collected data seem not perfect in some way (e.g., non-significant or unexpected results). Typically, no or not perfect data sessions are scheduled for 120 minutes and include four oral presentations of early stage research. Each individual presentation lasts 10 minutes and is followed by a discussion with the audience of 10 minutes. The aim of the no or not perfect data format is to provide a platform for researchers to get accustomed to presenting their research, to explore remedies for methodological challenges, and/or to discuss the adequacy of new/controversial research approaches. The special feature of this format is that each session will be supervised by senior researchers who will have made themselves familiar with the individual proposals beforehand and who provide comprehensive feedback for each participant. Alternatively, it is also possible to conduct data sessions in this track and to share data for co-analysis. In each room, in which no or not perfect data sessions will take place, a computer, digital projector, and internet access will be provided.



Language policy

English will be the main and official language of EARLI SIG 14. Considering the Francophone context of Geneva, contributions in French will also be possible. Contributors using the French language are invited to provide summaries or resources (e.g. Powerepoints) translated in English to facilitate mutual understanding. It will be assumed by the organising committee that the language of submission will be consistent with the language of presentation.

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